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How the New IMpB Requirement Impacts NetStamps Users

February 23rd, 2015

IMpB Requirements NetStamps

Effective January 25th, 2015, the USPS enforced a new IMpB requirement as a result of which Stamps.com customers need to make adjustments to the way they use NetStamps for their packages.  All USPS packages must now carry an IMpB tracking label.  Designed to function like stamps, NetStamps do not carry a barcode like shipping labels, which is why there are some limitations around their use going forward.

This change only impacts First Class, Priority Mail, Priority Mail Express and Parcel Select packages.  First Class letter postage is not impacted, for which Stamps.com customers can continue to print NetStamps, envelopes and mailing labels at the discounted Commercial Base rates.

Using the Stamps.com software?
You can still print postage for First Class packages, as well as Priority Mail, Priority Mail Express and Parcel Select packages on NetStamps, but at retail rates only.  Additionally, these packages must be accompanied by the Form 400 USPS Tracking Label, which can be ordered at the Stamps.com Store.  To continue receiving the discounted Commercial Base rates, print shipping labels for these packages.

Using Stamps.com Online?
Stamps.com Online customers will no longer be able to print NetStamps postage for First Class packages, as well as for Priority Mail, Priority Mail Express and Parcel Select packages.  Use shipping labels instead!  All shipping labels generated by Stamps.com already contain the IMpB-compliant tracking barcode and our customers will continue to receive discounted rates.

Printing PhotoStamps?
If you are creating PhotoStamps to use on your Priority Mail Flat Rate Envelopes (1 oz.), you will continue to be charged $5.60 for postage, but the Form 400 USPS Tracking Label will need to be included for these mailings.

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